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11 Mar 2014 - 10:46:04 am

´╗┐Heel Pain (Plantar Fasciitis)


Plantar fasciitis is the most commonly occurring heel pain seen in runners, obese people and pregnant women. The thick band of tissues in the bottom of your feet get inflamed, causing pain. The heel pain is usually felt on the inside of the heel. The pain is also felt along the arch of the feet and along the border of the heel. You feel a stabbing pain, especially, in the morning as the plantar fascia tightens up. The pain reduces as the tissues stretch, but it may worsen if you stand, walk or run. This condition is seen in athletes, dancers and jumpers.

You should also be doing gentle calf stretching exercises. This will reduce stress on the plantar fascia in two ways. The first manner in which a relaxation of the tension in the calf muscles can help heel pain is that it will reduce the direct pull backwards on the heel bone (calcaneus). The second reason is a little bit more complicated, but essentially it is that a tight achilles tendon and calf muscles causes the rearfoot to move in a manner that causes over pronation as your leg and body move forward over your foot. To strengthen the muscles in your arch toe curls or "doming" can be done.

Is a foot condition usually felt as pain in the bottom of your foot around the heel. There are about 2 million new cases of this condition reported every year in the USA only. That pain especially hurts first thing in the morning when you try to stand on your feet, or after sitting for awhile. This pain is caused by an injury of the fascia connective tissue at the bottom of the foot. This tissue is called the plantar fascia and it connects the heel bone to the toes. Usually this injury is caused by overload of the foot.

Heel pain is common complaint in runners. Actually, heel pain is common in all people. 40% of all visits to podiatrists in the U.S. are because of heel pain. Of all of the different causes of heel pain, the vast majority is due to a condition known as plantar fasciitis. This is an inflammation in the band of tissue (the plantar fascia) that runs from the heel to the toes. This condition is most often caused by a tight achilles tendon or poor foot structure such as overly flat feet or high arches.

An easy home exercise for plantar fasciitis involves the use of a tennis ball or any small ball that is comfortable to use on the bottom of the foot. The exercise is performed by placing the bottom of the foot on top of the ball and gently rolling the ball back and forth. This is thought to massage the muscles and stretch the muscles along the sole of the foot to relieve tension. This can be performed while seated or standing while holding on the a wall or chair. The exercise can be performed for 30 seconds to a minute at a time followed by a period of rest. plantar fasciitis taping

The plantar fascia is a thick fibrous band of connective tissue originating on the bottom surface of the calcaneus (heel bone) and extending along the sole of the foot towards the toes It has been reported that plantar fasciitis occurs in two million Americans a year and in 10% of the U.S. population over a lifetime. Another symptom is that the sufferer has difficulty bending the foot so that the toes are brought toward the shin (decreased dorsiflexion of the ankle ). A symptom commonly recognized among sufferers of plantar fasciitis is an increased probability of knee pains, especially among runners Diagnosis edit.

Plantar fasciitis pain can last six to 18 months or longer, so it is important to be patient. Your podiatrist will evaluate your feet to determine if you need to have special supports, called orthotics, inserted into your regular shoes or your running shoes. You may be asked to stop carrying heavy weights or participating in sports until your foot heals. Your podiatrist may refer you to a physical therapist to start a series of exercises to strengthen and stretch your foot and calf muscles, including wall stretches and stair stretches. Medical Interventions.

What is the value of this stretch? The plantar fascia runs the length of the foot from the heel bone (calcaneus) to the toes. During a running stride, the plantar fascia undergoes a rather sudden lengthening and then shortening during the landing phase - much like a rubber band that is suddenly stretched and then allowed to shorten. This 'elastic' event requires the plantar fascia to be sufficiently supple and strong to handle such stress without breaking down. Insufficient elasticity in the plantar fascia combined with the tendency to over-pronate (which puts extra stretch on the plantar fascia) is a nearly foolproof formula for pf problems.

You have painful plantar fasciitis , then you are probably looking a for quick and easy resolution to your pain. Right NOW! You think your alone with this one. More than 2,700,000 searches per month of people just like you looking for answers! You are probably not worried about the how's, why and what for's but are looking for plain and simple answer and techniques to get rid of your pain. This is the most common cause of foot problems in western society. This condition is a condition due to an inflammation of the flat band of tissue called the plantar fascia.

For immediate pain relief, your podiatric physician can give you a cortisone injection. There are many conservative treatments for plantar fasciitis that when used accordingly are very successful. You should be icing and stretching the bottom of your foot daily. Your podiatric physician may refer you to a physical therapist to aid in your treatment and to teach you the most effective stretching techniques for your foot type and condition. You may also be advised to wear a night splint that stretches your tendons and fascia in your foot while you sleep. These treatments can significantly reduce the inflammation of your plantar fascia and thus reduce your pain. plantar fasciitis brace
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